24th May: Russian Alphabet Day

Russian alphabet

24th May: Russian Alphabet Day

The language has a very special role in Russian culture and society, so does the Russian alphabet. Of course, everywhere the language is a crucial element of people’s identity, but in Russia there is something going beyond that. Indeed, it is the Russian language which makes of the Russians a single nation with a shared cultural background. Russian language is about the single cultural aspect which is common to the multiple ethnic and religious communities dispersed throughout this huge country. Wherever they live and independently of the fact that they may have an own language, all Russian citizens write in Russian alphabet and speak a highly standardized language. Surprisingly to many westerners, virtually no local accents or dialects exist. Language, both written and spoken, represents thus the core of the Russian identity. Accordingly, the great masters of the literature like Pushkin, Chekhov, Dostoyevsky, etc. are commonly seen across the country as almost having an aura of sanctity. Furthermore, Russian alphabet and its creators, the Saint Brothers Cyril and Methodius, have a prominent role and are celebrated every year across the country on May 24th.

This year, on May 24th, a number of events take place in all big Russian cities starting at 1 PM Moscow time. In both Moscow and St Petersburg are organized big commemorations during which choir music will be performed. In St Petersburg the concert will take place on Dvortsovaya Square.

On the Red Square in Moscow, after an opening speech given by the Patriarch Kiril, there will be another choir concert. Also, Muscovites could go to a cinema for free in one of the following theatres of the chain Moscow Cinema (Московское кино): Sputnik (Спутник), Saturn (Сатурн), Cosmos (Космос), Zvezda (Звезда) and Fakel (Факел).

For more information on the list of events for respectively St Petersburg and Moscow, you can check the following websites: Saint Petersburg events  and Moscow events.

Good Luck!

Garbis, currently studying Russian at Liden & Denz Moscow 

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